Vancouver, B.C.

About the Event

“Tatlong Bagsak for Black Lives: Combating Anti-Blackness in the Filipina/x/o Community” is a symposium presented by [email protected] Educational Partnerships, Balay Kollective, Pinayista, Asian Solidarity Collective, Can’t Stop Won’t Stop, and Asian American & Pacific Islander Student Services. The goal of this event is to provide a space to discuss the following questions:

ISANG BAGSAK: How is Filipina/x/o freedom tied to Black Liberation?

DALAWANG BAGSAK: How can Filipinas/xes/os be in solidarity for Black Lives?

TATLONG BAGSAK: How can our Filipina/x/o community continue to spread this critical dialogue?

The symposium aims to tackle these questions through two panels with leading thinkers and activists who will provide us with research, experiences, stories, and a language to use when discussing anti-Blackness. The last part of the symposium is devoted to providing an opportunity  to train and support to leaders, educators, and those who want to bring this dialogue back to their organizations, communities, and families. This will be in an interactive workshop format guided by activists and teachers in the Filipina/x/o community. There will be a community lesson plan, resources, and strategies that will be provided at the workshop. We hope that by spreading this dialogue, we can contribute to combating anti-Blackness in our community.

Our Event Goals:
1) To prepare Filipinas/xes/os to tackle anti-Black racism and anti-Blackness within their organizations and communities.

2) To build coalitions between organizations and across identities/communities.

3) To learn to live our values (eg. humanization and solidarity).

4) To feel prepared to host a dialogue with your organization/community.

5) To commit to transformative solidarity.

There is a two-step registration process for this event:

Step 1: Register for Panels

To participate in the workshop: TATLONG BAGSAK: How can our Filipina/x/o community continue to spread this critical dialogue? (Scroll down to read more about the Leader Training workshop. Limited spots available.)

Step 2: Register for Leader Training Workshop
To participate in the workshop:

TATLONG BAGSAK: How can our Filipina/x/o community continue to spread this critical dialogue?

(Scroll down to read more about the Leader Training workshop.  Limited spots available.)

Event Schedule: Sat June 20, 2020

*Closed captioning will be provided during the first two panels, and 3rd part upon request.

10AM
PT

Isang Bagsak | Past (open to the public)

PANEL DISCUSSION
How is Filipina/x/o freedom tied to Black Liberation?

11:30AM
PT

Dalawang Bagsak | Present (open to the public)

PANEL DISCUSSION
How can Filipinas/xes/os be in solidarity for Black Lives?

12:30PM
PT

Panels End + Lunch Break

Panel 1 and Panel 2 are open to the general public to attend and listen in. This part of the event will be presented on Zoom via Webinar format. Please register below to get access to the Zoom.

1PM
PT

Tatlong Bagsak | Future

LEADER TRAINING (must apply to participate)
How can our Filipina/x/o community continue and spread this critical dialogue?

2:30PM
PT

Event Ends

Thank you!

“Tatlong Bagsak”

Isang Bagsak (one down) is adopted from a ritual used by Anti-Martial Law activists in the Philippines. To show unity, Isang Bagsak was powerfully proclaimed by a member of the movement and in unison the community would make a loud sound either by clapping or stomping. As time has gone on, various activist organizations have borrowed the use of Isang Bagsak to show unity at their marches, protests, meetings, and events.

Started by my compadre, Artnelson Concordia, a teacher-activist-scholar, Isang Bagsak was combined with the Unity Clap, which some have attributed to the Farm Workers Movement. The combination of the Unity Clap and Isang Bagsak starts off with a slow clap and crescendos in a faster pace clap that culminates into someone yelling Isang Bagsak and the community responds with a single clap or stomp that shows their togetherness.

In [email protected] Educational Partnerships (PEP), we have rearticulated both the Unity Clap and Isang Bagsak by creating the Tatlong Bagsak ritual. The Tatlong Bagsak ritual also begins with the Unity Clap and then is followed with someone yelling Isang Bagsak to represent our PAST together, then the community responds with one clap or stomp, then it is the quickly followed by an Dalawang Bagsak (two down) and the community claps or stomps two times and this represents our PRESENT work together and a commitment to be present with each other. To end the ritual, someone yells Tatlong Bagsak (three down) and the community claps or stomps three times and this represents our FUTURE journey together.
-Allyson Tintiangco-Cubales (2005) San Francisco State University
Professor of Ethnic Studies
[email protected] Educational Partnerships, Founder
Community Responsive Education, Co-Founder and Co-Director